Native Americans were ousted from their land by cunning scheme and sheer power of the English and other Europeans. The newcomers regarded Native Americans, who had lived in these lands for many thousands of years, as pagans and savages. They believed that their Christian faith entitled them to grab the Native American territories. By some quirk of fate, the English conquered Native Americans not so much with their firing weapons in a straight fight as by betrayal and violence using the situation when the number of Native Americans greatly reduced because of illnesses.

The cosmologies of Native Americans usually insist that they had always been present in the Americas. However, the DNK evidence, as well as archeological findings, reveal their origins in northeastern Asia. They migrated to the Northern America through Bering Strait 14,000-13,000 years ago. These first people in the Northern America are called Paleo-Indian, and the traces of vital activities were found in Oregon, as well as in the South America, in Chile. They subsisted on big animals such as mammoths, bisons, mastodons, but the warming of the climate changed flora and fauna, and megafauna went extinct. In the Archaic period, around 10,000 years ago, Paleoindians continued hunting, but also they began relying on agriculture and growing plants. At that period, they lived in tribes, in small groups. As there were several waves of migration from the Asian continent, the ethnical content of the Northern America was not unified. Siberians moved to Alaska, Dene entered from Asia, and Algonquins moved within the Northern America. The Formative period is roughly dated 4,000 years ago, and it was characterized by the flourishing of agriculture. Formative cultures cultivated the sunflower and corn. A larger reliance on plant food production rather than on unstable hunting allowed the tribes to develop their economies and subsequently political organization.

When the colonizers of the Old World arrived, they brought their traditions and bacteria with them. Both were detrimental to the seemingly robust health of Native Americans. The first and visible threat to the indigenous people was weaponry brought from Europe. Physically fit Native Americans skillful with a bow and arrows could do nothing against spitting fire sticks that killed them. Alcohol was the second threat to Native Americans who did not have the special elements in their blood and bodies to digest it properly. Thus, many Native Americans literally drank themselves to death. However, the most incredulous thing was that Spaniards, as well as other Europeans, brought specific bacteria and diseases Native Americans did not have immunity against.

When the Pilgrims arrived to the Northern American on the Mayflower ship, the local Native Americans, Wampanoag, lend them hand with hunting and farming to help them survive winter. At that time, Wampanoag were weakened by the tribal war and were in urgent need to allies. That is the reason why the tribes chief decided to help the English survive. He thought that he could control such a small number of weak people, and his people would benefit from the union. The Native American chief, Massasoit, believed that the Pilgrims were the representatives of King James, and it truly was an alliance between friends that would be mutually advantageous. Further on, the Wampanoag agreed to trade only with the English but not with the French and acted as intermediaries between the newcomers and other tribes. With the course of time, the reciprocity of influence of the Wampanoag and the English created tensions. First of all, the Pilgrims were aware of the Native Americans being pagans in terms of Christian faith. Secondly, the English were a minority and, therefore, in case of unrest, they could be in danger. While the Wampanoag could protect the newcomers from any unwelcomed invasion of neighboring tribes, the Pilgrims attempted to stand for themselves on their own and preemptively killed some Indians in the Massachusetts tribe. It frightened many Native Americans in the Wampanoag tribe, but they still believed that they were friends with the English. One of the ways of building up the relationships was by trading. Native Americans did not trade if there were valid reasons not to do it. They wanted to have metal objects that Europeans brought from Europe such as axes, cow bells, knives, etc. Therefore, they needed to discover what they could offer the English in order to strengthen their relations. Eventually, the Europeans understood that Native Americans could offer them the fur. Read more detatils on prime writing website.

When several years later the Puritans arrived in Massachusetts, their settling into the land went easier, as they were more numerous, better equipped, and it was helpful that many of Native American tribes died after an epidemic of smallpox. The English newcomers arrived with a sense of entitlement and a belief that God blessed them to occupy these lands, and it is Gods hand that cleared up the territory for them. No longer did they feel that their number was insignificant as it increased dramatically. They brought their plants and domestic animals, and these new agricultural traditions upset agricultural traditions and customs of Native Americans. For example, a large number of pigs were detrimental to North American corn and vegetables. It became the source of conflict. Europeans and Native Americans viewed and treated land differently. Whereas for Europeans land is a sign of status and wealth, Native Americans regard it more as a property of the community and a thing subjected to communal and thoughtful use. After the English had firmly established their settlements, they no longer needed Massasoit’s assistance, and he had nothing to bargain. At some point, Massasoit sold a part of his tribes land, but, not being satisfied with the payment of beads and gift, he could not return his land. The English said that the land was now theirs, and the deal could not be undone.

After the English settlements had grown in power, the Puritans wanted to continue the expansion. Their means were shocking for Native Americans. Witnessing the massacre of 700 Pequots, the Wampanoag could not comprehend what was the reason for killing so many people, including women and children. It revealed to Native Americans the length to which the English could go in order to reach their goals and spur other neighboring tribes to seek friendship with them. Feeling their strength, the English announced Native Americans that they needed to convert to Christianity if they wanted to live side by side. It means that Indians had to ditch all their customs and traditions and accept English ways. Consequently, Christianity, or, at least, the nominal proclamation of Christianity, became a necessary condition for assimilation and, subsequently, survival for Native Americans. Incrementally, the English took away Native American lands, and by providing medical services, they imposed debts on them. Eventually, the English stopped treating Native Americans as their allies, and it became evident that they regarded them as subjects and unequal.

Each side of the conflict over the North American lands views it differently. Whereas it is a shining story of the beginning of American history for the Puritans, it is definitely a story of betrayal and loss for Native Americans. The crucial decision that Massasoit had made when the newcomers first arrived destroyed his tribe and deprived all Native Americans of their lands and ancestry.Native Americans were ousted from their land by cunning scheme and sheer power of the English and other Europeans. The newcomers regarded Native Americans, who had lived in these lands for many thousands of years, as pagans and savages. They believed that their Christian faith entitled them to grab the Native American territories. By some quirk of fate, the English conquered Native Americans not so much with their firing weapons in a straight fight as by betrayal and violence using the situation when the number of Native Americans greatly reduced because of illnesses.

The cosmologies of Native Americans usually insist that they had always been present in the Americas. However, the DNK evidence, as well as archeological findings, reveal their origins in northeastern Asia. They migrated to the Northern America through Bering Strait 14,000-13,000 years ago. These first people in the Northern America are called Paleo-Indian, and the traces of vital activities were found in Oregon, as well as in the South America, in Chile. They subsisted on big animals such as mammoths, bisons, mastodons, but the warming of the climate changed flora and fauna, and megafauna went extinct. In the Archaic period, around 10,000 years ago, Paleoindians continued hunting, but also they began relying on agriculture and growing plants. At that period, they lived in tribes, in small groups. As there were several waves of migration from the Asian continent, the ethnical content of the Northern America was not unified. Siberians moved to Alaska, Dene entered from Asia, and Algonquins moved within the Northern America. The Formative period is roughly dated 4,000 years ago, and it was characterized by the flourishing of agriculture. Formative cultures cultivated the sunflower and corn. A larger reliance on plant food production rather than on unstable hunting allowed the tribes to develop their economies and subsequently political organization.

When the colonizers of the Old World arrived, they brought their traditions and bacteria with them. Both were detrimental to the seemingly robust health of Native Americans. The first and visible threat to the indigenous people was weaponry brought from Europe. Physically fit Native Americans skillful with a bow and arrows could do nothing against spitting fire sticks that killed them. Alcohol was the second threat to Native Americans who did not have the special elements in their blood and bodies to digest it properly. Thus, many Native Americans literally drank themselves to death. However, the most incredulous thing was that Spaniards, as well as other Europeans, brought specific bacteria and diseases Native Americans did not have immunity against.

When the Pilgrims arrived to the Northern American on the Mayflower ship, the local Native Americans, Wampanoag, lend them hand with hunting and farming to help them survive winter. At that time, Wampanoag were weakened by the tribal war and were in urgent need to allies. That is the reason why the tribes chief decided to help the English survive. He thought that he could control such a small number of weak people, and his people would benefit from the union. The Native American chief, Massasoit, believed that the Pilgrims were the representatives of King James, and it truly was an alliance between friends that would be mutually advantageous. Further on, the Wampanoag agreed to trade only with the English but not with the French and acted as intermediaries between the newcomers and other tribes. With the course of time, the reciprocity of influence of the Wampanoag and the English created tensions. First of all, the Pilgrims were aware of the Native Americans being pagans in terms of Christian faith. Secondly, the English were a minority and, therefore, in case of unrest, they could be in danger. While the Wampanoag could protect the newcomers from any unwelcomed invasion of neighboring tribes, the Pilgrims attempted to stand for themselves on their own and preemptively killed some Indians in the Massachusetts tribe. It frightened many Native Americans in the Wampanoag tribe, but they still believed that they were friends with the English. One of the ways of building up the relationships was by trading. Native Americans did not trade if there were valid reasons not to do it. They wanted to have metal objects that Europeans brought from Europe such as axes, cow bells, knives, etc. Therefore, they needed to discover what they could offer the English in order to strengthen their relations. Eventually, the Europeans understood that Native Americans could offer them the fur.

When several years later the Puritans arrived in Massachusetts, their settling into the land went easier, as they were more numerous, better equipped, and it was helpful that many of Native American tribes died after an epidemic of smallpox. The English newcomers arrived with a sense of entitlement and a belief that God blessed them to occupy these lands, and it is Gods hand that cleared up the territory for them. No longer did they feel that their number was insignificant as it increased dramatically. They brought their plants and domestic animals, and these new agricultural traditions upset agricultural traditions and customs of Native Americans. For example, a large number of pigs were detrimental to North American corn and vegetables. It became the source of conflict. Europeans and Native Americans viewed and treated land differently. Whereas for Europeans land is a sign of status and wealth, Native Americans regard it more as a property of the community and a thing subjected to communal and thoughtful use. After the English had firmly established their settlements, they no longer needed Massasoit’s assistance, and he had nothing to bargain. At some point, Massasoit sold a part of his tribes land, but, not being satisfied with the payment of beads and gift, he could not return his land. The English said that the land was now theirs, and the deal could not be undone.

After the English settlements had grown in power, the Puritans wanted to continue the expansion. Their means were shocking for Native Americans. Witnessing the massacre of 700 Pequots, the Wampanoag could not comprehend what was the reason for killing so many people, including women and children. It revealed to Native Americans the length to which the English could go in order to reach their goals and spur other neighboring tribes to seek friendship with them. Feeling their strength, the English announced Native Americans that they needed to convert to Christianity if they wanted to live side by side. It means that Indians had to ditch all their customs and traditions and accept English ways. Consequently, Christianity, or, at least, the nominal proclamation of Christianity, became a necessary condition for assimilation and, subsequently, survival for Native Americans. Incrementally, the English took away Native American lands, and by providing medical services, they imposed debts on them. Eventually, the English stopped treating Native Americans as their allies, and it became evident that they regarded them as subjects and unequal.

Each side of the conflict over the North American lands views it differently. Whereas it is a shining story of the beginning of American history for the Puritans, it is definitely a story of betrayal and loss for Native Americans. The crucial decision that Massasoit had made when the newcomers first arrived destroyed his tribe and deprived all Native Americans of their lands and ancestry.

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